Building social capital for 1st gen students — Nolvia Delgado // Kaplan Educational Foundation

Nolvia Delgado, Executive Director at the Kaplan Educational Foundation, delves into empowering first-generation students in the post-affirmative action landscape. Building social capital prepares students for professional success, equipping them with the skills to network, self-advocate, and connect with mentors. However, first-generation students must navigate several challenges ranging from cultural differences in education to the pandemic’s impact and remote learning. Today, Nolvia discusses building social capital for first-generation students.
About the speaker

Nolvia Delgado

Kaplan Educational Foundation

- Kaplan Educational Foundation

Nolvia Delgado is Executive Director at Kaplan Educational Foundation

Show Notes

  • 01:02
    Social capital and parental considerations
    Social capital involves equipping students with skills required for professional success, including advocacy, networking, and mentorship. Parents should provide children with the tools to achieve academic and long-term career success.
  • 01:48
    Challenges faced by first generation students
    The pandemic limited opportunities for first-gen college students to pursue internships and network. As a result, students' social skills have fallen even further behind compared to the pre-COVID era.
  • 02:49
    Reframing social capital for first generation students
    During the pandemic, first-gen students developed valuable skills like managing multiple schedules and caring for younger siblings. While not considered traditionally social capital, these abilities are applicable professionally and can be leveraged for internships or future jobs.
  • 03:59
    The relationship between social capital and first
    Social capital significantly influences academic success for first-generation students. Skills like self-advocacy, particularly with professors in the event of issues, are crucial in college and remain a valuable asset throughout their professional careers.
  • 06:03
    Cultural impacts on student teacher dynamics
    For some students from different cultural backgrounds, parents instill a belief that the teacher holds absolute authority, hindering a collaborative partnership in education. When students arent encouraged to view teachers as partners, it limits academic success.
  • 06:34
    The long term impact of building social capital
    A bachelor's degree potentially boosts lifetime earnings by over $1.2 million compared to a high school diploma. Encouraging skill acquisition for social capital from high school prepares students better for success at the bachelor's level and beyond.
  • 07:20
    Practical strategies for parents to help children build social capital
    Recognize and translate childrens experiences, like babysitting, into professional skills. Parents should also encourage children to respectfully practice self-advocacy and seek out mentors at an early age.
  • 08:23
    Creating mentorship opportunities for children
    Parents can create mentorship opportunities by connecting children with their network. Ultimately, parents must recognize their children's experiences as assets and help them identify how existing skills can be translated to the professional setting.
  • 12:39
    Community organizations for mentorship
    Local community-based organizations have the biggest impact on students because they understand the community's needs. Parents should explore and prioritize local community organizations, as they are more likely to effectively address student needs.
  • 14:41
    How parents can support students for academic and professional success
    Listen to what children are comfortable with and avoid pushing too hard, as it might set them back. Factor in the impact of COVID on their education and take the steps to nurture existing skills and support the acquisition of new ones for professional development.

Quotes

  • "A bachelor's degree typically leads to a payoff of over $1.2 million more than a high school diploma. From high school, students should think about acquiring the skills to prepare for success at the bachelor level." - Nolvia Delgado

  • "Students need to have people who can guide them, and parents should nurture that so that students feel comfortable seeking out mentors and understand the importance of it from an early age." - Nolvia Delgado

  • "Removing terms like 'mentor' or 'networking,' and breaking the process down into bite-sized pieces makes it easier for students to approach potential mentors." - Nolvia Delgado

  • "Local community organizations for mentorship understand the needs of the community and can provide the biggest impact on students." - Nolvia Delgado

  • "Listen to your child. Listen to what they're comfortable with. Don't push too hard because that can set them back." - Nolvia Delgado

About the speaker

Nolvia Delgado

Kaplan Educational Foundation

- Kaplan Educational Foundation

Nolvia Delgado is Executive Director at Kaplan Educational Foundation

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